IDville Blog | September 2012

Minnesota to grapple with Voter ID referendum in November

by Admin 10. September 2012 11:16

As many as 84,000 people in Minnesota could be affected by a proposed voter ID requirement, according to estimates by the North Star State's office of the secretary of state as cited in a published report.

But the office estimates that as many as 131,000 do not hold the right kind of identification card, which displays the bearer's present-day voting address, The Star Tribune reports. Those who do not have the identification card with the correct information on it amount to roughly 4 percent; those who do not have a state-issued ID total 2.7 percent.

The amendment under consideration mandates that all voters display an officially-issued photo ID prior to exercising their right to vote. Those who are considered most vulnerable to the November referendum are the elderly, the impoverished and students.

Administrator Robert Letich with old age home Camden Care Center in North Minneapolis said the proposed referendum must be seriously considered.

"It was a six-month process to get an ID. So if you want to vote, you better start planning," he told the news source, noting the impact will be harsh if some of his residents are prevented from casting ballots. "All these people would be disenfranchised from the election. And that generation takes it really seriously. They want to vote."

But one state, Mississippi – which wrote into its constitution the mandate of a photo ID, included an exemption for nursing homes, according to director Michele Kimball with AARP Minnesota.

She said what the elderly now faces is pretty close to a disaster.

"It's just a nightmare scenario," Kimball told the news source.

Also expected to be impacted by the new law is the poor, according to Colleen O'Connor Toberman with Our Savior's Housing. She estimated that three-quarters of the people who enter the Minneapolis program for shelter and housing are registered voters.

She emphasized the importance of voting for some of these people.

"They're often being overlooked," Toberman told the news source. "Voting is the only way they can be heard."

The proposed referendum's harm to students is unclear but it is likely to have some sort of impact since private-college ID cards are under scrutiny.

Another question is what to do about out-of state students in Minnesota, who are eligible to vote if they go home.

The Minnesota Daily, the University of Minnesota at St. Paul newspaper, cited a poll indicating nearly 71 percent of college students are not equipped with the correct state-issued identification card.

Currently rated 1.5 by 2 people

  • Currently 1.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Tags:

Black clergy must motivate eligible voters to acquire proper ID, Sharpton says

by Admin 7. September 2012 15:15

Black members of the cloth should visit the states that have implemented voter ID laws and encourage voters who are black and Latino to acquire the needed identification so that they may cast ballots in November's General Election, The Reverend Al Sharpton told a luncheon during this past week's Democratic National Convention in North Carolina.

BET reports the top official of the National Action Network said ministers should visit those states within the next four weeks for what he said is a state of emergency.

Also a host with MSNBC, Sharpton underscored the gravity of this issue and said Voter ID laws pose a very serious threat.

"This is no joke," the civil rights activist said regarding the laws presently in force in numerous U.S. states as the presidential election is about 60 days out. "The disenfranchising of 5 million people in this country is nothing short of revoking the Voting Rights Act."

Laws requiring the use of identification cards have been challenged in the various states where they've popped up due to allegations that they discriminate against people who do not have them, can't afford them and do not know where to go to get them.

But supporters claim that the identification cards are one key way of staving off voter fraud.

Civil rights groups have stepped forward to advocate for those who are eligible to vote but cannot due to a lack of proper identification.

"We have to leave here and work and work," the reverend told the Charolotte luncheon. "We have to leave here and get people to register and get their voter IDs."

The Religion News Service reports many African-American clergy already have answered the call to rouse eligible voters. Members of the clergy have joined the effort of civil rights activists who have long challenged the voter ID laws.

Be the first to rate this post

  • Currently 0/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Tags:

Eastern Pennsylvania school prepares for state Voter ID law

by Admin 7. September 2012 11:44

A college in Eastern Pennsylvania has adapted its identification cards so that its students may use them to vote, according to a published report.

The state is the 33rd to legislate a voter identification law that attempts to stave off voter fraud, The Lafayette reports. Those who take issue with the law claim it is slighted against minorities and low-income people who might not be in possession of a driver's license or a passport.

This past July, Lafayette College added expiration months and years to the ID cards, which Student Life Director Pamela Brewer said validates the school's identification card for voting purposes.

"Pennsylvania law [honors] university or college identification, as long as there is a concrete expiration date," government and law professor John Kincaid told the news source.

The law mandates voters bear the correct identification when casting ballots, which would include IDs issued by the federal or state government.

Lafayette is populated by many Pennsylvania residents who already have valid state identifications. Brewer said roughly one-fifth of the school's students are equipped with approved Pennsylvania identification cards.

But out-of-state students, even if they are registered to vote in Pennsylvania, will not be able to vote with out-of-state identification cards.

The college's older identification cards do not have expiration dates on them and students who attempt to use them will be unable to vote. But the newly formatted ones should be honored.

"Lafayette was way ahead of the curve on this, and, over the summer, several other local colleges contacted us for advice on this issue," Brewer told the news source.

Newly arrived freshmen were given the ID cards when they first came to campus and kicked off their college pursuits. They should be able to register to vote in the state.

But upperclassmen who continue using the older identification cards will not be able to use those to cast ballots. They may go to the ID office and acquire a new ID card in exchange for the older one.

The school intends to remind the student body of the changes by distributing a campus-wide email on September 17, which is Constitution Day. That email will contain information about registering.

Voters must register to vote in the state of Pennsylvania by October 6.

Located in Easton, Lafayette College was established more than 175 years ago, according to the school's website.

Be the first to rate this post

  • Currently 0/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Tags:

Tampa school enforced security measures during nearby RNC

by Admin 6. September 2012 13:50

A Southern Florida college had to adjust its security standards late last month thanks to a bunch of politicians coming to town, according to a published column.

The University of Tampa mandated staff, students and other people looking to gain access to the campus wear Spartan ID badges during the Republican National Convention, The Minaret reports. Campus Safety effected the changes out of consideration for the safety and well-being of the students and author Elaina Zintl notes her apprehension.

"I, as a new freshman at UT, was nervous about the RNC and grateful for the safety measures put in place," Zintle states in her column.

Members of the staff and the students all had to wear neon lanyards that had identification cards attached to them while the RNC was in process beginning the week of August 26.

While the convention was in process, people whose lanyard and ID were not clearly demonstrated could have been stopped. Not everyone wore the lanyards and identification around their necks but, rather, held on to them or had them dangling from their pockets as a method of avoiding being stopped.

Prior to the RNC kicking off, campus officials issued several emails that sought to remind the students to wear the lanyards. Freshmen were instructed to attend at least one of the three mandatory security sessions that were being conducted on the Sunday that kicked off the week holding the RNC.

The security sessions featured officials advising students to be alert and vigilant and not to act recklessly. The officials underscored the mandate of wearing  the lanyards.

One factor that got in the way of wearing the lanyards and identification badges was forgetfulness – despite the overt neon color of the lanyard holding the required documentation.

Campus Safety went out of its way to be of assistance. One student, a second-year commuter, said the school was enormously helpful given she does not live on campus.

"I'm a commuter, but I'm not staying at my permanent address," sophomore biology major Tara Temkar told the news source. "So they sent my lanyard to my parents' house when I was already in Florida, and I didn't have it sent down."

Conducted from August 27 through August 30, the Republican National Convention that nominated former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney to challenge President Barack Obama was held at the Tampa Bay Times Forum. Walking between the Forum and campus was roughly 20 minutes.

Currently rated 2.7 by 6 people

  • Currently 2.666667/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Tags:

University of Iowa upgrades ID cards

by Admin 6. September 2012 11:20

In the past, students at the University of Iowa were required to carry multiple ID cards if they wanted to attend sporting events, access dormitories or perform a number of other daily academic-related activities. To make life easier for students, faculty and staff members, the school is rolling out a new program that will provide individuals with a single badge, according to a report by independent newspaper, the Daily Iowan.

Around 9,000 student ID cards - dubbed the Iowa One card - have been handed out so far. Many community members were already using badges for residence hall functions that required access control, the news source said.

"We have a campaign in progress to re-card the rest of the residents in the next three weeks," UI spokesman Tom Moore said, according to the Daily Iowan. "When that population is served, we will begin the conversion to the Iowa One card for other students, faculty and staff."

The Iowa One cards are contactless, which eliminates the need to students living in dorms to get a separate ID for access to their residence halls.

"[The Iowa One card] eliminates the need to carry the extra Prox card," UI sophomore Blake Jorgensen told the Daily Iowan. "I use it the same way I used my last one but I like the fact that I can use it and get access to my hallway."

Furthermore, the new student ID cards are integrated with local Hills Bank, allowing users to access bank accounts via their ID badges, the news source said. This process is not new, as the old ID card also had similar functions, but it gives Hills Bank a unique opportunity to appeal to incoming freshmen looking to have a local bank account.

"During orientation, we connected over 25 percent of the incoming freshmen with ID cards that are also attached to their bank accounts," said Ken Hinrichs, an executive at Hills Bank and Trust Co., according to the Daily Iowan. "There has also been very strong interest in new accounts with the IDs linked to the cards, as returning students have come back to school from the summer."

Using multi-functional, contactless ID cards is becoming more common throughout multiple industries, including education and the private sector. As advances in technology continue to drive innovation, ID cards will likely continue to be more useful to users.

Be the first to rate this post

  • Currently 0/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Tags:

Northern Kentucky University gets newly designed ID card

by Admin 5. September 2012 11:45

The class of 2016 at Northern Kentucky University will be the first in the school to embrace a newly designed student ID card. Last year, the student government association at NKU created a contest that allowed community members to create their own model of the school's All Card in an effort to boost awareness and school spirit, according to a report by student-run newspaper the Northerner.

"The whole thing started about this time last year when Dustin Robinson, former SGA president, approached me with the idea of coming up with a student designed ID card," Ward Wenstrup, operations manager at All Card administration, told the newspaper. "I thought it was a great idea."

In addition to the overall design of the card, NKU administrators also made the change to imprint the student identification number on the badge. Unlike the traditional ISO number that was on the old cards, the ID numerals are similar to Social Security numbers in the sense that they help individuals with their financial demands, the Northerner said.

"I think it's very positive to see the design being well received," Wenstrup said, according to the Northerner. "I truly appreciate the student-submitted design but anything that makes the kids excited about their card, I'm all for it."

According to NKU officials, every student, faculty and staff member is required to have an All Card with a photograph and ID number for identification and access control purposes. Although the newly designed ID card is different from the older model, individuals are not yet required to make the change. By creating a new design, however, individuals may be less inclined to lose it and, as a result, lose the abilities that come with it.

Be the first to rate this post

  • Currently 0/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Tags:

Upstate New York school deploys scanners for student IDs

by Admin 5. September 2012 10:58

A Western New York state university is placing increased importance on its identification card, according to a published report.

Students at the College of Brockport who do not have their Brockport ID cards with them will be unable to gain entry into the gym, eat a meal at the dining hall or get back home into their residence hall, The Stylus reports.

Students at the school, which is part of the State University of New York System, will be unable to go to campus-held events also. Two particular events – Glow Fiesta IV and Club Craze – served as examples of the new rules as they only entered after swiping their ID cards where a scanner read their cards.

The banner identification on the card was read by a scanner and the student was permitted to enter following a short beep, which indicated the person is a current student. But the operator was tipped off to trouble if that beep was longer.

The effort drives to preserve "integrity with the usage of the student activity fee," assistant director Matt Barone with the Student Union Activities told the news source. The Office of the Student Union and Activities also is involved and is gauging event attendance.

This new system has begun "for a few different reasons," Barone told the news source. "First, attendance tracking is nice. It's nice for us to know who's going to what. There's also a co-curricular transcript tool in myBrockport, where if you went to Club Craze last night, you will be able to generate a co-curricular transcript of all the things you've been involved in or have attended. So that you could say to a potential internship site or a potential job place, 'here are the things I've been involved in and here's the record of that.' As opposed to saying you did that, you can say here's actual proof of that."

The Student Union purchased four scanners to check the ID cards, according to Barone. Community Development acquired one scanner. Leadership Development owns as many as three. One scanner costs $10 and the various organizations that want to make use of the scanners will be able to.

Students who already have had their ID cards scanned will receive email notifications of upcoming events.

The College at Brockport was founded in 1865 and encompasses 464 acres, according to the school's website. The school offers 49 undergraduate majors and 47 master's degree programs.

Currently rated 1.7 by 3 people

  • Currently 1.666667/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Tags:

Pittsburgh students question state voter ID law

by Admin 4. September 2012 11:06

A Western Pennsylvania college student who plans to volunteer at a voting site for the general election in November feels for the plight of the poor and the elderly, according to a published report.

Junior political science major Alyssa Knierim with Point Park University in Pittsburgh is scheduled to volunteer at polls in Millvale and she said the elderly and the poor will face challenges voting because of the difficulties getting to the Motor Vehicles Department to acquire the mandated identification, The Point Park Globe reports.

But the need to stave off voter fraud is ever present and important, another student told the news source, noting officials should put more effort into easing the process of acquiring IDs for those societal demographics.

"They should make it easier to get one, and make people more aware of it, and maybe when someone comes without an ID, they can give them the information they need to get one," freshman cinema production major Hannah Meholick told the news source late last week.

Next week will see the Pennsylvania Supreme Court hear an appeal to a judge's rejection of arguments against the voter ID law, more officially known as Act 18. Those who will argue the case include a coalition led by the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania.

The ACLU takes exception to the Commonwealth Court stating last month that Act 18 ultimately will cause "inevitable" harm as compared to "immediate" harm.

"I think it's an infringement on our basic rights as American citizens. If we are a government for and of, and by the people, the people should be able to participate," Knierim told the news source late last week. "It shouldn't be that hard to vote and for some people it is, especially elderly people."

Pennsylvania governor Tom Corbett signed Act 18 into law this past March; the lawsuit filed by the ACLU came about 60 days later.

The ACLU stands opposed to the law because it believes it controverts the U.S. constitution.

"We believe this is unconstitutional. We should not be putting up a barrier to voting and under this law are people who are not going to be able to get the ID necessary or people who won’t know that they need the ID until they show up at the polls and don’t have the right ID," associate director Sara Mullen with the ACLU said.

Established as a business training college in 1933, Point Park University has been a four-year school since 1966, according to the school's website.

Be the first to rate this post

  • Currently 0/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Tags:

Report: Access control to grow 11 percent annually through 2016

by Admin 4. September 2012 10:22

American businesses and homeowners continue to combat burglary, fraud and other criminal activity by purchasing advanced security solutions. Ongoing advances have made many of these technologies more efficient, accurate and convenient, encouraging decision-makers to adopt the tools at a faster rate.

A new study by the Freedonia Group echoed this trend, forecasting the market for U.S. security products to expand at a compound annual growth rate of more than 7 percent through 2016, at which point it will generate approximately $21 billion in annual revenue.

There are many reasons for increased adoption of advanced security solutions, including the unstable economy, which is forcing service providers to drop their prices to remain competitive, allowing a wider range of customers to leverage the tools. While this allows decision-makers to pick from an array of offerings, most tend to lean toward access control systems.

The growing access control market

The Freedonia Group forecast access control systems to experience strong momentum in the future, as analysts predict the market to expand by roughly 11 percent annually through 2016. Technological innovations have made these solutions easier to use and more reliable than other locking mechanisms, making them an ideal choice for property owners looking to keep unauthorized individuals away from valuable possessions.

As more decision-makers make the move to adopt access control systems, an increasing number of vendors will flock to the market in an attempt to acquire new customers and generate more revenue. In doing so, however, service providers will be forced to drop their prices to remain competitive, allowing a wider range of users to leverage the solutions, the report said.

Another driver behind the growing access control market is the recovering housing sector. Since identity authentication technologies become less expensive, more homeowners will switch out existing locks for more advanced mechanisms that are able to keep intruders out, the Freedonia Group reported.

Developments in the ID card and authorization accessory industry are also fueling the adoption of access control. A separate report by EBN Online echoed this finding, noting that the evolution of smart cards will play a significant role in the changing access control market. Contactless solutions, such as near-field communications, will become a major player in access control in the coming years.

As decision-makers continue struggling to keep out unauthorized individuals, access control will become an important part of physical security investments.

Be the first to rate this post

  • Currently 0/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Tags:

You have one chance to make a first impression!

by Falon 4. September 2012 09:38
Falon
Take a look around your office. Do you see signage by at your desk or outside of meeting rooms? Put yourself in the shoes of a visitor. If you were visiting your facility for the first time would you be able to easily identify where the Receptionist sits or which meeting room you need to go to for a conference you’re attending? As you look around, if you can’t find these locations easily it may be time to look into investing in office signage for your facility! 
 
Choosing office signage can be more complicated than you think. There are tons of types, brands, and colors to choose from. Here at IDville, we have clearly defined our facility with nameplates and office signage; which means we can help you determine which type of signage is best for your office.  

Ensure your office is visitor friendly with office signage!
 Browse our selection of Nameplates & Office Signage 

Engraved Nameplates: These are sure to encourage a feeling of welcome and belonging! Personalize each desk space for your employees and promote a professional office image. Shop engraved nameplates. Shop engraved nameplates.
 
Clearlook Signs: Exclusively sold at IDville, Clearlook signs are simple to install and look great on any office wall. These are a great way to identify rooms that will be frequently visited. Sleek, contemporary, and functional! Shop Clearlook signs.   
 
Wall Mount & Door Mount Nameplates: Add your logo and employee information and these are sure to easily identify your staff or office areas with these simple yet unique nameplates. Shop wall mount nameplates. Shop door mount nameplates.
 
Full Color Nameplates: Make your interior office nameplates pop with vibrant color! Full color nameplates allow you to add some creativity and fun to your office environment! Shop full color nameplates.
 
Custom Nameplates: Custom nameplates allow you to choose from many options such as engraved or full color, frame options, plate colors, graphics options, and fonts. Completely design your nameplate from start to finish. Your employees are sure to love these! Shop custom nameplates.
 
Now that you’ve had a chance to learn more about office signage options, I hope it’s an easy decision to determine which style works best for your office. If you have any questions, call us at 1.866.438.4553 or send us an email. We’re here to help! 
-------------------------------------------------------

Falon is the IDville Project Manager with over seven years marketing and product experience. Falon is known for her exquisite taste in identification products and her three beautiful young sons.

Currently rated 1.8 by 36 people

  • Currently 1.777778/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Tags: , ,

Office Identification | Signs

Sign Up for IDville Emails!

Get special offers, information and tips with IDville’s email updates.

Sign Up

We Think You'd Like


IDville on Facebook