IDville Blog | August 2012

ID cards might not have reached all Missouri voters in county impacted by tornado

by Admin 7. August 2012 11:10

One in four voters are projected to show up and cast ballots in a Southwest Missouri county today for a primary election, county officials told The Joplin Globe.

Factors that contribute to that forecast turnout include lingering issues remaining from the Joplin tornado, new addresses for some voters and new voter ID cards held by some voters, according to Jasper County clerk Bonnie Earl. But those issues are unlikely to prevent voters from casting ballots, she said.

The potential for troubles with voting because of the tornado was one that Lieutenant Governor Peter Kinder attempted to stave off in a letter that aimed to open resources to help officials in the county "ensure voters are not disenfranchised due to last year's tornado."

But one of every eight new voter identification cards mailed by the county clerk's offices were returned by the post office, according to Earl. Of 80,000 new voter identification cards, roughly 10,000 did not make it to their destination because people did not change their addresses with the assistance of officials after their former residence had been impacted by the tornado in May 2011.

The former clerk emphasized the importance of going to the clerk's office and changing that information to reflect the adjustment.

Earl said voters may adjust their addresses at the polls and make use of another ID.

"They can just go to their new polling place and make the change there," Earl told the news source. "I don't want people to think they'll not be able to vote if they've not changed addresses or if they don't have a new voter ID card; that's not true."

KTVO reports the voter identification cards that were sent via postal services to Missouri residents include information about in what precinct voters may cast ballots.

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Two may be better than one!

by Falon 7. August 2012 09:35
Falon
Single-sided or dual-sided? It’s one of the first questions you should ask yourself when purchasing a photo identification printer.  Depending on how you intend to use your ID cards will determine which type of printer you should purchase. 
 
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Falon is the IDville Project Manager with over seven years marketing and product experience. Falon is known for her exquisite taste in identification products and her three beautiful young sons.

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Judge issues extension to hash out ID disagreement in New Jersey

by Admin 7. August 2012 06:28

A New Jersey judge has given two opposing parties seven weeks to hash out their disagreement over state identification badges, according to a published report.

New Jersey Superior Court Judge Paul Innes said this past Friday that the American Civil Liberties Union and the Motor Vehicle Commission of New Jersey have until Friday, September 21 to reach an agreement over the dispute that landed them in court in the first place.

Until that point, New Jersey may not impose more strict requirements on people who are in pursuit of driver's licenses. In the meantime, people who are after driver's licenses or would like to renew their licenses are able to use the six-point ID system presently used by the state.

Demand for those requirements is part of a federal program called TRU-ID, which aims to fortify how secure state-issued licenses and ID cards are. The federal government says states must adhere to more strict standards so that people may use these identification cards to gain entry to commercial flights or access federal buildings.

Acquisition of the new licenses is possible by people supplying a Social Security document and two proofs of residence. Recently expired passports no longer are sufficient for these requirements.

Opposition manifests from those who advocate for immigrants and the homeless. Privacy concerns are the main driver for the ACLU, which filed a lawsuit this past May that aims to stop TRU-ID immediately prior to it beginning.

The case filed by the ACLU itemized concerns about the process. New Jersey sought to impose the new requirements but did not explore the rule-making procedure, such as collecting commentary from the public on the matter.

"Any time the state obtains documents which are personal in nature they have to at least state why they're doing so," attorney Ed Barocas with the ACLU told the news source.

If the civil rights group and officials with the Garden State are unable to strike a deal by the date set by the judge, the civil liberties union will solicit the judge to disallow any new IDs from being issued while the dispute continues in the courts.

Officials with the Motor Vehicle Commission and the New Jersey Attorney General's Office declined to comment to the news source.

The New Jersey Record reports deputy attorney general Phil Espinosa told the judge at Friday's hearing that both sides were in discussions as part of an effort to reach an agreement.

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ID cards for children supported in Upstate New York, South Carolina

by Admin 6. August 2012 09:29

Efforts to advocate for the safety of children in an Upstate New York town will resume one night early this week when an organization will host an identification card booth at a town party, according to a published report.

The National Night Out  party in Lebanon on Tuesday evening will see Masons from the East Linn Lodge host the table as they have since 2007, The Albany Democrat-Herald reports.

Nationwide chapters of the organization are gung-ho about identification cards for children, which it considers to be a national project.

"We've had the program going for five years, and so far we've done about 5,800 students," child ID coordinator Greg O’Neal with the lodge in Lebanon told the news source. "If it saves one kid, it's all worth it."

Organizers are genuinely hopeful that families never have to use the identification cards because that typically would mean that some sort of emergency or disaster has reared. But should an emergency occur, information like a picture of the child and a fingerprint sample would be at the ready and, hopefully, serve a valuable purpose in confronting the challenge at hand.

One key factor in dealing with these types of situations is time, particularly the necessity and opportunity to proceed quickly through the investigative process, according to a local police chief.

"Even more so when you are dealing with a missing child," police chief Bob Burford with Sweet Home told the news source.

The Masons produced child identification cards earlier this year at the annual safety fair of Sweet Home.

But the Masons do not store information about the children, O'Neal told the publication. And once the parents are provided a card that information is deleted from the computers.

The cards offer parents one tool to act rapidly in the case of an emergency. The identification cards are equipped with directions on how parents may broaden information about their children.

"On the cards we attach some information on how the parent can collect and keep a DNA sample," O'Neal told the news source.

Similar efforts ensued this past weekend in South Carolina.

The Hartwell Rotary Club and the Pilot Club of Hartwell distributed applications to parents for complimentary Amber Safe Child Silver ID cards, The Independent Mail reports. The identification card can come in handy should a child go missing.

"Basically, the parents provide us with the information we need - height, weight, hair color, eye color and any medical conditions," coordinator Herb Hicks with the Rotary Club told the news source.

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Pennsylvania schools work to remedy ID cards without expiration dates

by Admin 3. August 2012 12:23

Numerous colleges and universities in Pennsylvania are taking steps to ensure members of their student bodies are able to vote in the general election in early November, according to a published report.

Arguments have wrapped up regarding the Voter ID law in the commonwealth and the schools do not want to run the risk of having their students be unable to cast ballots, The Sentinel reports. The centerpiece of the November 6 election features U.S. President Barack Obama attempting to stave off efforts by former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney to unseat him.

Schools like Shippensburg University, Dickinson College and Messiah College distribute student identification cards that do not have an expiration date, which often is very necessary to enable voting. Rather, these identification cards hold a picture of the bearer and that student's name.

Before the law was enacted, Shippensburg University had no need to include an expiration date, according to the school's executive director for University Communications.

"They were made for campus use only," Pete Gigliotti told the news source.

Numerous statewide schools are laying plans to issue new identification cards to students that contain expiration dates, The Associated Press reports.

Other schools are remedying the issue by providing stickers that have expiration dates that may be affixed to the identification cards.

"What we're doing is providing IDs with dates on them," Gigliotti told the news source. "If a student needs an ID with an expiration date that would be valid for voting, we will provide them with one that is dated. For current students, students who need one will be provided with one. We do have the capability of those needs."

Closing arguments in the case were delivered this past Thursday, The Associated Press reports. The judge who is presiding over the case is likely to issue a ruling on the matter some time this month.

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Arizona school system to mandate ID badges this year

by Admin 3. August 2012 12:21

A Central Arizona city is preparing to require all students in the public school system to wear identification badges, according to a published report.

Students ranging from kindergarten through 12th grade at the Scottsdale Unified School District will be required to wear the badges beginning this school year, according to KPHO.

While high school students in the school district already were under mandate to carry their identification badge as students, those students will have two options for the identification cards beginning next week, when school begins.

They may wear the ID badges around their necks with the aid of a lanyard or they may clip it to the clothing that they are wearing. The first day of school is scheduled for next Wednesday, August 8.

The mandate is considered a method of enhancing security of the students while they are at school.

"Nothing is going to be different because they have always had to have an ID, it's just the culture of now having to remember to put it on," chief security officer James Dorer with the school district told the news source.

For children to be registered as kindergarteners with the Los Angeles Unified School District, parents must figure out which school they are going to, complete a form for that school and bring it, proof of the child's age noted on a birth certificate, a baptismal certificate, a passport or similar form of ID, according to Echo Park Patch.

Also required is proof of the child's residence, which may be done with something such as a utility bill.

Options are readily available for the children to attend various schools in the district, which might not be in the home neighborhood of the child and his or her family. Parents and guardians should note the deadlines for filing paperwork.

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Medicare ID cards need adjustments in California

by Admin 2. August 2012 15:13

Officials with the California Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) are needing an additional 180 days to determine how much it will cost to remove Social Security digits from Medicare identification cards, according to a published report.

The results of the probe are likely to impact as many as 48 million beneficiaries whose Social Security numbers are listed on the Medicare identification cards, California Healthline reports.

Chief Information Officer Tony Trenkle with Medicare said informing the public of a time frame for the news cards is not possible without the assistance of cost estimates that are accurate.

One cost estimate already released, which ranged from $800 million to $845 million to redesign the card, was considered flawed, according to a report issued by the Government Accountability Office.

But concerns are rising as to whether CMS is genuinely concerned about the issue at hand.

U.S. Representative Sam Johnson, a Texas Republican, said that the U.S. Defense Department and health organizations already have undertaken measures to have their insurance cards redesigned.

Also the chairman of the House Ways and Means Social Security subcommittee, Johnson noted that CMS had been asked to do exactly that several years ago.

"I don't understand what's taking so long," Johnson told the news source.

The procedure and process for undertaking the task is not easy, Trenkle told the news source. He said it is an intricate responsibility that requires updating systems with information technology. Medicare members must be informed about those adjustments and reassessing budget priorities released by the U.S. Congress also must be factored into the situation.

Across the country, adjustments also are set to be added to driver's licenses for Kentucky, according to The Associated Press.

Offices of clerks with circuit courts are set to install new tools and equipment so that these changes may be added to the identification cards.

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Mississippi official advocates for benefits of voter ID card

by Admin 2. August 2012 11:34

Mississippi will be capable of supplying complimentary identification cards for the Voter ID law that is soon up for approval, according to a published report.

Delbert Hosemann, secretary of state of Mississippi, released a response late last week to an academic criticism of mandating voter identification, The Jackson Free Press reports. The Brennan Center for Justice at New York University issued its report, "The Challenge of Obtaining Voter Identification," on July 17. Hosemann answered that report on July 26, stating in a press release that the academic report is "purposely inaccurate and misleading."

The offices of the state of Mississippi's 35th secretary of state answers the academic report with criticism of factual errors within the report and it advocates for the strengths and positive contributions offered by the identification program.

The report "exaggerates the population number, then multiplies it by the 'estimated' number of people without transportation, to provide a totally fraudulent number of 48,329 voting citizens without a vehicle more than ten (10) miles from a state ID issuing office," the press release states. "This statement is false and the Brennan Center had knowledge to the contrary when the 'Report' was issued."

The response by the secretary of state points out that 92 offices are dispersed among 82 counties, contrary to the offices cited by the Brennan Center, which noted only the ones that are open two days a week.

The response also answers the academic report's sharp critique of necessary steps to acquire a birth certificate as part of the effort to secure a voter identification card.

"Further, it claims the cost of a birth certificate, if one were necessary, is $15, and there is a Mississippi 'Catch-22' which is 'particularly perverse,' the press release states. "It states Mississippi requires a photo-ID to obtain a birth certificate.  What they do not say is each Circuit Clerk will be able to access the National Association for Public Health Statistics to verify available birth certificate data across the country at no cost to the applicant by simply obtaining basic information from the applicant."

Hosemann's office advocates for the high responsibility it holds for its civic responsibilities during the voting process.

The press release notes these efforts and states how it is helping.

"Our State takes seriously its obligations to qualified voters," according to the press release. "We are working to identify all citizens who may not have an ID, to assist with transportation to a local courthouse, and to provide a completely free voter ID."

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ID card for Oklahoma University students to make life more convenient

by Admin 1. August 2012 11:36

Ambitious students who are returning to school this fall at Oklahoma University have a strong ally on their side: the Sooner OneCard.

The Oklahoma University Daily reports that the card does a whole lot more than serve as a key to rooms in dormitories. It also opens a world of access to several different available services on campus.

Students may acquire meals, borrow books from the library and gain access to the myriad facilities that the campus has to offer its student body, according to a director at the school.

"It identifies you as a member of the OU community," community experience director Ryan Trevino with the school told the news source.

The Sooner OneCard will help students fill up with food offered by their meal plan, he said. The students also are able to use the card to spend meal points and meal exchanges at the various locations of campus dining locations.

The ID cards also have Sooner Sense, a method of payment that relies on the school's system for debit.

"It's the most flexible form of payment available," Trevino told the news source.

Two locales on campus – the Walker Tower and the Couch Center – each have stations where students may install these cards with Sooner Sense, he said.

The debit system may be used at assorted vending machines throughout the school's campus.

The Huston Huffman Center, computer labs located on campus and school sporting events like gymnastics and baseball games also are accessible thanks to the Sooner OneCard. Students also may use the ID card for transportation purposes aboard the Cleveland Area Rapid Transport bus system.

"To sum up the OneCard in two words – it's official," Trevino told the publication, citing the ID card's motto. Honors students may use the ID card to gain access to Honors College computer labs.

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Douglas County becomes Kansas' first to distribute voter ID cards

by Admin 1. August 2012 11:32

An Eastern Kansas county is the state's first to distribute photo ID cards to voters, according to a published report.

Douglas County also becomes the state's only county to distribute the forms of identification for voting purposes, The Kansas Reporter states. The move comes after 2011 legislation permitted the state to distribute identification cards to people who are eligible to cast ballots but are not in possession of a driver's license or another form of photo ID.

The majority of the identification cards will be manufactured by the Kansas Department of Revenue. Each card costs $8, the funding of which is covered by the fees on drivers' licenses.

The first card was handed out earlier this week to an older man who went unidentified yet who does not have a photo ID that is recognized by the state of Kansas. He does not drive thus is not able to get to the Division of Motor Vehicles, which is in Lawrence, the seat of Douglas County.

The state of Kansas closed its motor vehicle licensing and titling operations for one week this past May as part of the effort to change to a computer network that ran $40 million.

The postponement - as well as some technical problems - and additional training mandated for the service's employees has caused long lines and short tempers during a three-month span when people were attempting to execute transactions to renew licenses and their titles at the busiest motor vehicle office in the state of Kansas.

"We don't intend to replace anything the state is doing," Douglas County Clerk Jamie Shew in Lawrence told the news source. "But we did want to make the IDs available to more people at times and on days when the DMV wasn’t opened."

The office also has laid plans to send a mobile van to nursing homes for the purpose of distributing the ID cards. The old age homes were determined to host a larger amount of residents who do not hold ID cards, per the mandate of the Kansas Secure and Fair Elections Act of 2011.

The valid ID card first was distributed this past Monday, according to the Baldwin City Signal.

Qualification for the ID card includes citizens being a registered voter, not already the owner of a valid photo ID and being able to provide a document that demonstrates residency according to regulations denoted by federal law.

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