IDville Blog | August 2012

PSU tightens access to facilities in fallout of scandal

by Admin 23. August 2012 15:57

A college in Pennsylvania has tightened access to its facilities in the aftermath of a scandal, according to a published report.

Only students, faculty, staff members and retirees who are equipped with identification cards may use the various recreational facilities of Pennsylvania State University, according to StateCollege.com.

The newly ordered policy targets members of the public who have no association with the school.

Those who are equipped with the correct identification card may bring with them one guest.

The new policy was executed on July 11, 48 hours prior to the release of a probing report orchestrated by Louis B. Freeh, who was hired by the school to investigate how the administration handled circumstances surrounding pedophilia allegations against an assistant coach with the school's football team.

"The University's new facilities policy is an important part of an overall plan to provide the safest environment possible to our constituents, and also re-emphasizes our commitment to offer athletic and recreational space for the use of our students, faculty, staff and their guests," assistant vice president Steve Shelow with University Police and Public Safety said. "It's important to note that we will continue to honor prior agreements with outside organizations to use these facilities."

The school mandated that any exception to the policy implemented last month must be articulated in writing and verified for approval by the school facilities that are tasked with overseeing access to the athletic and recreational facility.

"Penn State Athletics has proactively pursued this important change in University policy," acting athletic director Dave Joyner said. "This is the latest step in our department's efforts to strengthen the safety and security of our facilities for students."

Graham B. Spanier, formerly the president of the school prior to being terminated in the wake of the scandal, insisted in an interview with ABC News that he did not cover up the assistant football coach's crimes against boys.

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NFC-enabled access control systems garnering attention

by Admin 23. August 2012 12:58

The components making up access control systems have evolved during the past several years, moving beyond traditional magnetic swipe ID cards. Instead, many corporations are leveraging near-field communications, which has allowed them to authenticate an individual's identity through a variety of devices, including contactless ID cards and smartphones, according to a report by A&S Magazine.

"This new way of thinking is driving fundamental changes in how we deliver and manage secured identities," Tam Hulusi of HID Global said, according to A&S Magazine. "Today's new form factors for credentials improve user convenience and flexibility but they also raise questions about how to ensure that all identities can be trusted."

Controversy grows in the evolving access control industry

One of the biggest questions in identity management today is whether or not access control systems can properly distinguish fraudulent and verified identification, the news source said. If an individual is using an NFC-enabled smartphone, for example, some pundits are unsure if the access control system can determine if the identity on the phone is being used by the real person.

On the other hand, it may be easier to manage NFC-based smartphones as identity authentication devices since they are digital and are more valued by end users.

"At a minimum, users will be far more likely to notice and report a lost phone carrying a portable identity credential than they would a missing card," Hulusi said, according to A&S Magazine. "Additionally, NFC phones with embedded keys and credentials will make it easier to efficiently modify security parameters."

Most access control systems available today require two-factor authentication, which most often come in the form of an ID badge and a PIN. By using NFC-enabled smartphones, decision-makers can enhance these processes during times of heightened security and make them operate in real time, which was not possible with plastic cards, A&S Magazine reported.

A separate report by MarketsandMarkets forecast the NFC applications market to expand at a compound annual growth rate of 35 percent through 2016, eventually generating more than $34 billion in revenue. This increase will largely be attributed to the use of NFC-enabled smartphones and evolution of access control systems.

As these changes continue to take place throughout the public and private sectors, the secure capabilities will likely become more advanced, encouraging more decision-makers to use NFC for access control.

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DOJ relaxes Virginia voter ID requirements

by Admin 22. August 2012 12:13

Voters in Virginia may use numerous identification cards to vote, according to approval issued by the U.S. Justice Department.

NBC News reports that voters who do not have any identification will be unable to cast ballots.

The state of Virginia will permit voters to cast ballots if they bear an identification card issued by a state college or university in addition to paperwork that does not have a picture. Items such as a recent utility bill, a bank statement, a government check and a paycheck that displays the name and address of the voter will suffice.

Virginia's laws and regulations are not as stringent as other states' mandates for voters to have identification requirements.

Virginia has approved voter registration cards in state that do not include photographs in addition to more traditional forms of identification such as a license to drive and other government identification cards. The commonwealth also granted approval for the use of employee photo identification cards.

The newly approved law brings to a close permitting a voter to exercise his democratic right by affixing his signature to paperwork that declares one's identity.

The new law approves provisional ballots for someone who arrives at the polls and does not have any form of identification.

However, the voter has up to 72 hours to submit a mode of identification that is approved.

Governor Bob McDonnell ordered the state election board to supply all voters with a voter card, which is one of two forms that the law honors.

But one state senator expressed disappointment in a press release, according to The Daily Press.

"It is disappointing that (the DOJ) has supported voter suppression efforts in Virginia," Democrat Mamie Locke said. "This only plants the seed for more egregious measures to be pursued by those who wish to undermine many segments of the voting population."

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Choosing the Right Photo Identification Card Printer

by david 22. August 2012 11:30
david
Choosing an ID card printer is never an easy process, especially when there are so many options available. Do you want a printer that prints one or two-sided ID cards? Do you intend to print 100 or 1,000+ ID cards a year? What does your budget allow you to spend? Are you looking for advanced security features? 

All of these questions are factors to consider when choosing which type of photo identification card printer to implement into your organization. And we’re here to help make the purchasing process easier for you! One of the benefits of our ID card printers is that the printer can be purchased separately or as a system package. Each ID Maker System includes: 
 
ID cards ready in minutes!
 
The goal of the ID Maker System is to make creating and printing photo IDs easy for you and your staff.
 
Don’t forget to clean your printer! Keep your ID Maker printer running at its peak performance by following recommended cleaning schedules. I recommend a cleaning cycle every 700-1,000 prints. This ensures high-quality, digital photo IDs. Each cleaning kit includes cleaning cards and a pen. 
 
Follow these simple instructions to clean your ID Maker Printer: 
  • Press MENU then select “Clean Rollers” and follow the prompts on the printer.  
  • Remove the card hopper from the back of the printer. 
  • Open the lid and remove the dye-film. Leave the lid open.
  • Open the protective packet and remove the cleaning card. 
  • When prompted, insert the narrow end of the card into the card feed slot. The cleaning process will run automatically, and then the card will be ejected. 
  • Remove the card and repeat when necessary. 
Are you a customer of IDville? If so, let us know how your products are working out for you! If you think one of our ID Maker systems may be right for you, give one of our identification experts a call today at 1.866.438.4553. 
-------------------------------------------

David is an IDville Identification Specialist with over seven years product and sales experience.  Around IDville, David is known for his new product ideas, sports knowledge, and experience as a catalog model (you may have seen him in a previous IDville catalog!) 

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ID Card Printer Maintenance | ID Card Printers

College students in Las Cruces, New Mexico, need IDs to ride bus system for free

by Admin 21. August 2012 15:59

College students in Southern New Mexico may ride the local bus service for free with a valid student identification card, according to a published report.

Starting this past Monday, students at New Mexico State University and Doña Ana Community College - both of which are in Las Cruces - may ride the RoadRunner Transit bus system for free throughout the academic year for 2012-2013, the Las Cruces Sun-News reports.

The student identification card that must be presented on each occasion that one is pursuing a free ride must include the picture of the Organ Mountains with the tower at Goddard Hall, which is situated in the foreground.

Students who are not equipped with that identification card may acquire one simply by contacting the offices for identification cards on their respective campuses.

Earlier this month, the Las Cruces City Council granted approval to temporarily waive the fees that would have been charged as part of the effort to gather information that might drive toward a formal pass program. That might begin in time for fall semester of next year, according to transit administrator Mike Bartholomew with the city of Las Cruces.

Such programs are apt to appear in locales where a public transit system is in operation and that hosts institutions of higher education. The schools and the transit authority typically arrive at an agreement that often has the school remitting an annual sum that derives from student fees.

In addition to providing wide access, the programs also are able to fund transportation capacities that may prove to be beneficial to students and members of the communities.

New Mexico State University dates back to 1888 when Las Cruces College opened a two-room building, according to the school's website.

Established in 1973, Doña Ana Community College offers associate degrees and technical certificates, the school's website states.

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Access control systems can be eco-friendly

by Admin 20. August 2012 13:47

As the technologies within access control systems mature and evolve, the benefits associated with using the security mechanisms also change. In the past, access control systems were solely used for security purposes, monitoring and limiting traffic to restricted areas. Today, however, companies can use the solutions for a wider range of applications.

While most access control systems have the same underlying intention in common, the systems can come in a variety of forms. These range from devices that require individuals to punch in a keycode to making employees scan ID cards to authenticate an identity.

Overall, the use of access control systems can be an effective way to deter crime and ensure only the appropriate people enter restricted portions of a facility. A new guide by the British Security Industry Association, however, suggests that access control systems can be used for something else: reducing an organization's carbon footprint.

"This guide is a great tool for a host of different organizations and companies, providing information from some of the most experienced experts in the industry," said Mike Sussman, the chairman of the BSIA's access control section. "Any company looking to create a more efficient security system and wanting to manage their environmental footprint would benefit from considering the solutions outlined in this guide."

The new shape of access control systems

In today's highly controversial business world, demonstrating environmental responsibility has become a priority for many decision-makers, especially in large-scale enterprises and federal agencies. By leveraging innovative security technologies, organizations can not only enhance cost savings but can also reduce their impact on Mother Nature, the guide said.

By looking at the large amount of information that access control systems accumulate, it is easy to see how the technologies can enhance a building's energy efficiency. Since access control systems monitor and analyze how many people are allowed in a room, taking note of individuals' movements, the applications should be able to recognize when areas are unoccupied, and turn off the rooms' lights, heat and other utilities.

A separate report by Security Solutions noted that many internal components of access control systems and other security technologies are becoming green due to an increased demand.

While access control systems can be an efficient way to tell if an individual's ID card is real, the technology can also enhance a company's cost savings and reduce its carbon footprint.

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Photo ID cards issued in Mexico may be used by residents in Texas

by Admin 20. August 2012 12:12

Some state officials in Texas are concerned about residents of the state being able to use a photo identification card issued by the Mexican government to register or transfer titles on their cars, according to a published report.

Known as "matricula consular," the card may be used for as long as one year, The Houston Chronicle reports. The rule issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles of Texas is set to begin on September 3 and will come to a close on August 31 of next year.

Considered the first phase of the new rule, the allowance notates one county office will have to perform some adjusting as the rule nears enacting.

The tax office of Harris County presently does not permit the use of identification cards issued by foreign consular offices when moving forward with applications for titles and registrations. The offices will likely need to overhaul temporary procedures.

"I am not in favor of accepting the matricula card as a form of identification but my office will follow the new rule of the Department of Motor Vehicles," states an email containing a statement by tax assessor-collector Don Sumners that was sent by a county spokesman, according to The Houston Chronicle.

The official's opposition to the use of the matricula consular is partially due to the challenges of authenticating the card. The identification card is akin to a driver's license in both size and appearance and it demonstrates the holder's photograph, date of birth, address and an expiration date.

Harris County already is dealing with other issues regarding elections.

The county's education department filed a lawsuit last month regarding primary elections for two election department trustee openings, The Southeast Texas Record reports.

Filed July 20, the lawsuit names the county, county clerk Stan Stanart and Sumners as defendants, the news source reported earlier this month.

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Army base adapts policy regarding ID cards

by Admin 17. August 2012 14:30

A U.S. Army base in Georgia recently adjusted its policy regarding military identification cards, according to a published report.

Also known as the Common Access Card, the identification card is considered one of the most important documentation paperwork items used by members of the service, their family members and civilians with the U.S. Department of Defense and contractors, The Signal of Fort Gordon reports.

Garrison Commander Colonel Robert Barker enacted Garrison Policy 72, which prohibits duplicating military ID cards, as well as photocopying them and other government identification cards.

When a copy of a form of identification is required, the personnel ought to use a driver's license or a civilian identification card in its stead.

"I would question any business that tries to require a photocopy of a military ID," director Tom Brooks with the Military Personnel Service Division told the news source. "Why do they need it? If it's a business that offers a military discount, then seeing the ID should be enough. If it's for something like a rental property, then there's no reason people can’t just use a driver’s license."

Yet the new policy does have exceptions.

Copies may be used for hospitals and medical centers as outlined by the memorandum, which approves medical treatment, completion of paperwork for insurance claims, filling prescriptions and acquiring supplies.

Security personnel collects and destroys duplicated identification cards as a safety precaution.

Helping preserve safety is also the motive of a California check center.

The Community Voice reports the Check Center in Rohnert Park is set to issue free child identification cards this Sunday as part of an effort to help identify missing children in a more rapid fashion.

"We welcome the opportunity to sponsor this important effort in Rohnert Park," store manager Holly Wesley with the Check Center told the news source.

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Lead plaintiff in Pennsylvania ID case acquires photo ID

by Admin 17. August 2012 14:26

The lead plaintiff in the lawsuit challenging the Pennsylvania state requirement for all voters to bear a photo identification card in order to cast ballots acquired her photo ID on Thursday, according to a published report.

One day after a state judge preserved the new voter identification law and rejected the challenge filed by the American Civil Liberties Union, Viviette Applewhite, 93, journeyed to a Pennsylvania Department of Transportation office and acquired what she needs to cast a ballot, The Philadelphia Inquirer reports.

The law she testified against last month still remains remains in place yet she still has no driver's license. Neither does she hold a Social Security card. And the name cited on her birth certificate does not match that cited on her other documents.

The law states she should not have been granted a photo ID because of the difference in those names.

However, Applewhite went to the PennDot office in her motorized wheelchair and acquired a temporary photo identification card on Thursday, the publication reports. A permanent one will be mailed to her within 15 days.

"You just have to keep trying," Applewhite told the news source. "Don't give up."

Officials with the state said Applewhite's acquisition of a photo ID card fit perfectly with what the agency has long stated. Members of the staff at the centers for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation take into consideration age and additional factors when permitting exceptions to the list of documents that are required by the law, according to director Janet Dolan with the licensing bureau.

"PennDot has said all along that they would work with folks on a case-by-case basis," spokesman Ron Ruman with the Department of State told the news source.

When news of Applewhite's ability to acquire the photo identification card reached the lawyers challenging the state law, many responded with skepticism.

The law was challenged because of an alleged unfair burden it placed on the elderly, the poor and the young.

"PennDot was flexible providing the ID without Mrs. Applewhite having the documents required by law," co-director Penda Hair with the Advancement Project told the news source. "We wonder if that would be the case for someone who wasn't a lead plaintiff in a lawsuit and the subject of a lot of attention in the press."

The Associated Press reports attorneys who represented Applewhite and the other plaintiffs happened to have filed an appeal to the state judge's ruling on the same day Applewhite acquired the temporary ID.

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Pennsylvania judge does not halt state law demanding ID cards for voters

by Admin 16. August 2012 11:36

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is prepared to require voters during Election Day in November to display photo identification cards prior to casting ballots, according to a published report.

Commonwealth Court Judge Robert Simpson did not issue an injunction on a voter identification law that critics say has a focus on voters who are of minority demographics and college students, the New York Times reports.

Opponents of the law, which included the American Civil Liberties Union, solicited the judge to impose a delay that would last beyond the early November election. But proponents of the law support it as a method of staving off opportunities for voter fraud.

"We're not done, it's not over," attorney Witold J. Walczak with the American Civil Liberties Union told The Associated Press. "It's why they make appeals courts."

The past few years have seen numerous states pass laws mandating voters have identification cards.

The law in Pennsylvania was passed earlier this year by the state legislature. Republican Governor Tom Corbett signed it into law in March.

The Civil Liberties Union is likely to appeal the judge's decision and the next step is the State Supreme Court, and that appeal is likely to be filed by the end of this week.

The judge did not issue an injunction to stop the law, which critics say presents challenges for voters who are older, poorer and in college.

The judge turned down claims that the law violates the constitution, noting how helpful it will be people working at voting stations.

"The statute simply gives poll workers another tool to verify that the person voting is who they claim to be," the judge said, according to The Associated Press.

He said the plaintiffs put together a strong effort of humanizing the law but also noted that officials and agencies are exerting effort into generating identification cards.

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