IDville Blog | July 2012

Pennsylvania finalizing details on ID card for voters

by Admin 20. July 2012 15:31

The state of Pennsylvania is moving forward with identification cards that voters may use to ease the process of complying with state voter laws, according to a published report.

The Department of State directs elections in Pennsylvania and will announce the card within a month, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer. Voters may pick up the card at Department of Transportation centers throughout Pennsylvania.

The program is motivated by aiding voters whose efforts have not produced the kind of identification mandated by new laws on the books in preparation for elections this fall.

"If you can't meet the PennDot requirements for a non-driving ID because you are having trouble getting the necessary documentation together, there will be a way for you to obtain the Department of State ID for voting purposes only," spokesman Nick Winkler with the Department of State told the news source on Thursday.

The state of Pennsylvania mandates residents who are pursuing identification for purposes other than driving to supply their social security card, a birth certificate with a seal that is raised, proof of U.S. citizenship or naturalization or a passport, and proof of residency.

The spokesman did not expound what the new identification cards will look like. Neither did he describe all requirements for acquiring one of the cards as they presently are being ironed out.

Attorneys representing the interests of the state of Pennsylvania argue that the law for ID cards does its part to help preserve the rights of honest, law-abiding voters as it staves off fraud during elections. By contrast, the American Civil Liberties Union has its concerns about the cards due to worries about privacy.

In addition, the legislature of the state of Pennsylvania is charged with regulating elections, which the card helps with.

The Associated Press reports Secretary of State Carole Aichele said the card will be available toward the end of August and it will be valid for 10 years.

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Wisconsin voter ID law rejected by second judge

by Admin 19. July 2012 15:26

Legislation that would require Wisconsin residents to present photo ID cards before voting in elections took another hit recently after a second judge declared the law unconstitutional, the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reports.

According to the news source, Dane County Circuit Judge David Flanagan wrote in his ruling that the potential voter ID law would be a "substantial impairment of the right to vote," which is guaranteed by the state's constitution.

The move to block the legislation comes after Flanagan issued a temporary injunction in March, because the plaintiffs - which included the Milwaukee branch of the NAACP and immigrant group Voces de la Frontera - were expected to win their case, according to the news provider.

Flanagan's ruling marks the second rejection of the law, after Richard Niess, another Dane County judge, sided with the League of Women Voters of Wisconsin and decided to permanently block it in March. The second rejection reportedly makes it even more difficult for supporters of the voter ID legislation to win approval, according to the news source.

Voter ID laws have become a major discussion point around the country, as a number of states have proposed such legislation. The fate of a similar law in Texas is currently in the hands of federal judges, with the Justice Department already having rejected the legislation earlier this year, according to reports.

Under the proposed Texas law, acceptable forms of voter identification would include military IDs, U.S. passports, Department of Public Safety voter cards, U.S. citizenship certificates and licenses for concealed handguns, according to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Student IDs, however, would not be accepted, the news source said. 

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Washington city official pushing child ID cards

by Admin 18. July 2012 13:20

The use of ID cards is becoming increasingly popular around the country, with colleges, employers and towns expanding the capabilities of these documents.

In the Tri-Cities, Washington area, one local crime specialist is pushing hard for child IDs to help protect kids, local NBC affiliate KNDU reports.

Kennewick Crime Prevention Specialist Mike Blatman is attempting to kickstart the new project to increase safety for local children. Termed "My ID Card," the project would ensure that all children under the age of 16 will possess a laminated ID that includes their picture and address, according to the news source.

The program has reportedly succeeded in other cities, having begun 15 years ago in Seattle, the media outlet noted. Blatman said the benefits of the program extend to a number of different situations.

"A lot of times kids go maybe to daycare, maybe they're being helped or watched by a baby-sitter and it will have ID information on those children," he explained. "It will also help in the event that there is some sort of incident the child runs away or is missing, you'll have all that information right on the card."

Currently, Blatman said that CrimeStoppers has one sponsor for the program, but that more are needed to give it the green light. The project would reportedly cost $4,000 and the group is approximately halfway there.

Similar to the Washington initiative, a 15-year-old boy in Illinois recently dedicated his Eagle Scout project to creating emergency identification cards for local residents. The boy said the project was initially designed for only children, but he later expanded it to include the elderly population as well, the Pioneer Press reported. 

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Contactless ID applications continue to increase in numbers

by Admin 18. July 2012 11:59

As advanced access control systems continue to be used around the world, organizations are adopting next-generation ID cards on a more frequent basis. While this trend is happening throughout industries, the government, healthcare and citizen verticals are particularly increasing their adoption of ID cards.

A new report by ABI Research confirmed this finding, noting that the market for citizen, healthcare and government ID badges will generate more than $86 billion in revenue between 2012 and 2017.

Contactless is the new cool

Contactless ID cards, in particular, are growing in demand around the world and are widely recognized as today's "must have" identification technology, ABI Research noted.

"The trend to adopt a contactless interface will continue throughout the forecast period. We expect to see strong and continued adoption of dual interface [identity cards] primarily utilized in national ID cards," ABI Research analyst Phil Sealy said.

In fact, global contactless ID shipments are forecast to grow from 49 percent of the market in 2011 to approximately 61 percent in 2017. This will largely be driven by the increased deployment of national ID cards and electronic passports around the world, including in France, Brazil and Russia, among others. Cumulative shipments for national ID badges and e-passports will grow from 209 million units in 2011 to roughly 489 million in 2017, ABI Research reported.

Near-field communications becomes more widely used

By using NFC technologies, companies can integrate IDs into mobile devices, wristbands and smart cards. According to a report by NFC Bootcamp, NFC technologies are being used for broad applications, including entry and identity purposes at theme parks, music festivals and major events, to name a few.

Disney World, for example, recently announced its plan to use radio-frequency identification tools in a FastPass program that lets individuals use their RFID-enabled iPads to reduce the time it takes to wait in line. Additionally, Disney plans to give visitors RFID wristbands that automatically encrypts their identity and data onto an RFID chip that will act as a park ticket, NFC Bootcamp reported.

A report by MarketsandMarkets noted that the market for NFC applications is expected to expand at a compound annual growth rate of 38 percent through 2016, eventually generating more than $10 billion in revenue.

As contactless technologies mature, ID cards will be used for a wide range of purposes and applications, making the consumer and business lifestyle much more convenient.

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Connecticut town selectmen consider IDs for town officials

by Admin 17. July 2012 15:27

Selectmen in East Windsor, Connecticut, are reportedly discussing whether or not certain town officials should be given ID cards, the WindsorLocks-East Windsor Patch reports.

According to the news source, the issue at point stems from the requests of some town constables, who are seeking official town IDs in order to pursue positions that include serving legal documents.

During a meeting on July 3, Selectman James Richards explained that he did not think certain officials should have identification cards or badges, including police commission members. Richards said that the job of these individuals is strictly to manage the police department.

Still, Selectwoman Dale Nelson added that emergency management personnel should have IDs and keep them with them at all times. Selectwoman Dale Menard proposed putting the IDs on lanyards and keeping them at the emergency management department's office until they are needed, according to the Patch.

Richards, though, clarified that his major concern was that former town officials do not still possess their identification cards, according to the news source.

"I just want to know who’s got what," Richards explained during the meeting.

Identification cards have become a hot topic among legislative officials across the country in recent months, particularly when it comes to voting in elections. A number of states, including Pennsylvania and Texas, have pushed to implement legislation that would require people to present a certain form of photo ID before voting in elections.

However, these voter ID laws have also been met with skepticism. The Justice Department, for instance, has rejected the legislation. The Texas law was recently debated in federal court and is set to be decided upon by three judges, according to USA Today.

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Colleges implement advanced access control systems

by Admin 17. July 2012 11:18

Administers at Southeastern Community College recently implemented a new access control system for staff members working at the campus in Keokuk, Iowa, and centers at Mount Pleasant and Fort Madison. Rather than using traditional keys, the solution will authorize individuals based on their new ID cards, according to a report by the newspaper the Hawkeye.

"We will be moving toward an identification badge that would not only serve as identification for the employee but would also serve as an access card to allow them to get into the building during closed hours," SCC administrative services vice president Bill Meck said, according to the news provider.

Not every door will have the new technology installed. Instead, only the entrances that are not considered public will be included into the access control system, Meck told the Hawkeye.

While there was concern voiced at the SCC Board of Trustees meeting, during which the access control system was discussed, the majority of individuals believe the use of ID cards will be beneficial to the overall school system.

"[ID cards] are nice because with metal keys, you have a problem if you lose them," SCC trustee Dave Walker said, according to the Hawkeye. "With this key, you can get it reconfigured within the system and you are on your way."

Schools are revolutionizing access control systems

Other schools around the country are making similar improvements to security by installing innovative access control systems. In many cases, these new programs use near-field communications and mobile devices.

The University of San Francisco, for example, recently completed the second test of its NFC-enabled mobile device access control project, in which students used their personal smartphones as ID cards, according to a CR80 News report. The initiative received positive feedback from students who participated in the program, as many said using their personal mobile devices was just as easy as using their One Card campus ID cards.

"This convenience is important to us but equally important is the security of using their existing contactless credentials, keeping our transactions secure," USF One Card and campus security systems director Jason Rossi said, according to CR80 News.

As higher education schools become increasingly populated, more administrators will look to implement next-generation access control systems capable of meeting evolving demands without jeopardizing security. 

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What can Quantix Time and Attendance do for you?

by Kayla 17. July 2012 09:15
Kayla
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Kayla is a Marketing Specialist with over three years marketing experience. As a new addition to the IDville team, she is eager to share her social media savvy side and crazy affection for cats with IDville customers and co-workers. 

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Time and Attendance

Iowa veterans receive personal ID cards

by Admin 16. July 2012 11:35

Though the summer holidays celebrating America and those who serve the country have passed, one Iowa county has continued honoring its veterans by offering them ID cards to obtain discounts at local businesses.

According to Southwest Iowa News, the new identification cards allow veterans to show proof of their service, which can grant them access to discounts and free meals at many businesses across the state, particularly around Memorial Day and Veterans Day.

Louise Galbraith, a director at the local Veterans Affairs office, told the news source that the documents will make it significantly easier for veterans to identify themselves.

"At a lot of those businesses, you do have to prove that you are a veteran and very few actually carry around their discharge papers," Galbraith explained. "Not a lot of veterans have a form of military ID and a lot of veterans wanted to go to the veterans’ hospital just to receive an ID card."

Local veterans will be able to obtain their new ID card at the Veterans Affairs office in the Crawford County Courthouse on select days throughout July, the news source reports. Fees are not required, but veterans must produce their military discharge papers, which the VA office can help them acquire.

Galbraith noted that the cards themselves are of high quality.

"It’s a really nice card," Galbraith said. "It has the veteran’s picture on it and says ‘Crawford County Veterans ID Card’ with the branch of service and years served. On the back side, it says 'verified by Veterans' Affairs' and has our contact information."

Veterans and military IDs can serve a number of purposes, particularly in light of voter identification laws being debated around the country. Such IDs have been deemed acceptable under legislation that a number of states have attempted to implement. 

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Florida hospital visitors required to show IDs

by Admin 13. July 2012 12:01

Visitors to Florida's Medical Center of Trinity are quickly discovering how much of an emphasis the hospital places on security, the Pasco Tribune reports.

According to the news source, hospital visitors who come to visit patients are required to show their ID cards at the reception desk of either the main entrance, emergency room or patient check-in entrance. Upon showing the proper identification, visitors will be issued a badge that grants them access.

Though the security policy requiring visitors to obtain badges has been received with surprise from some residents, Thibaut van Marcke, chief operating officer of Medical Center of Trinity, told the news source that the added security represents the current trend in the hospital industry.

"Hospitals are private places of business, but we open our doors and we don't really take any precautionary measures to know who's coming in," van Marcke explained. "Employees have been badged for years. Physicians are badged. A few years ago, we started badging vendors when they are in the building. For us, this was the completion of making sure all folks coming into the facility are badged."

The hospital uses Fast-Pass technology to make the process more efficient. Visitors will have their ID scanned, a photo taken of them and will have a paper badge printed with their name, the room number they are visiting and "guest" status, the news source said.

Though the system does not include a background check, van Marcke noted that the technology allows the hospital to go back and see when a person checked in.

According to its website, Medical Center of Trinity is a 236-bed facility and has received recognition for its heart failure, heart attack, pneumonia and surgical care from the Joint Commission. The hospital opened in February.

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Minneapolis could require ID cards for door-to-door salespeople

by Admin 12. July 2012 12:44

The Minneapolis, Minnesota city council is reportedly expected to approve new rules that would require door-to-door salespeople to don a city-issued photo ID card, reports the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

According to the news source, the rules are designed to make it easier for homeowners to distinguish between legitimate salespeople and swindlers. The ultimate goal is to make it easier for residents to identify the "fly-by-night" operators, said Grant Wilson, head of business licensing for the city.

"They can be in our town, hit a neighborhood and be gone before we even get a complaint," Wilson told the Star Tribune. "So this way an exposed identification badge will be a good thing."

At the same time, however, the new rules would ease regulations on people who go door to door for religious or political reasons, as these individuals are protected under the constitution, the news source said. Non-commercial solicitors will not be required to obtain an ID or register with the city.

Nonprofit organizations like the Girl Scouts and schools will be allowed to obtain ID cards in bulk quantities if children are going door to door, the Star Tribune noted.

Similar rules were recently implemented in Dover, Delaware, where nearly all door-to-door salespeople are now required to register with the Department of Finance and wear photo identification. According to DelmarvaNow, the law is being referred to as the toughest of its kind in the country, and is designed to protect elderly citizens.

"This is an area that we hear from the public on a regular basis about," Kevin Carroll, director of the Consumer Protection Unit of the state Attorney General's Office, told the news source. "It's not uncommon to see it in the home improvement fraud context."

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